Lesson 22

 

Lesson 22 : The Team Makes Plans to Woo Madame Chu

Mark, Steve, Ron, and Sara meet to discuss the dumplings. Steve asks why they’re going into the dumpling business, but Ron says he supports the idea. Sara comes up with a new plan for approaching Madame Chu. Mark and Sara decide to fly to Beijing to present it to her.

Mark: We need a plan for Madame Chu’s dumplings.

Steve: I don’t mean to be a wet blanket , but why are we talking about dumplings? What about the meal kits?

Mark: We shouldn’t put all our eggs in one basket . You can keep working on the meal kits, while Sara and I work on the dumplings.

Steve: Aren’t we going to spread ourselves too thin

Mark: That seems like a risk worth taking

Ron: I agree. I think we should go for it

Sara: What about hiring Madame Chu to develop recipes for us and using “Madame Chu” as the brand name?

Mark: I think your idea is right on the money

Steve: Not to be a naysayer , but do you think Madame Chu will really go along with it ? You said before that she didn’t want to work with us.

Mark: She’ll have a change of heart when she hears our new offer.

Ron: Let’s move full steam ahead on this. Let’s get Madame Chu to sign on the dotted line

Mark: Okay, Sara and I will get on the next flight to Beijing to seal the deal with Madame Chu!

Ron: You’d better spend the whole week there. She may be difficult to woo.*

* woo – to seek the favor or affection of; to try to convince someone to do something

Idioms & Expressions

wet blanket – someone who discourages ideas; someone who spoils the enthusiasm or fun of a group

Example: When Tracy’s neighbors were playing loud music at 2 a.m., she knocked on their door and said, “I’m sorry to be a wet blanket , but I’m trying to sleep.”

(to) put all one’s eggs in one basket – to rely too much on one thing; to put a lot at risk by relying on just one plan

Example: Investment advisors recommend holding a variety of stocks and bonds. They say it’s important not to put all your eggs in one basket

(to) spread oneself too thin – to try to do too many projects at once, so that one doesn’t give enough time to any of them

Example: The small restaurant has announced plans to publish cookbooks and produce a line of frozen foods. I think they’re spreading themselves too thin

risk worth taking – worthwhile; a plan whose benefits are greater than the risks

Example: It’s risky for David to leave his job as a corporate lawyer to run an art gallery. But he says it’s a risk worth taking

(to) go for it – to proceed; to pursue a certain goal (sometimes taking on risk to do so)

Example: “I’m thinking of applying to film school.” — “I think you should go for it

right on the money – correct; sensible

Example: Your poor opinion of Ted’s girlfriend was right on the money . She ended up leaving him after she realized he wasn’t rich.

naysayer – someone who speaks against something; someone who often has negative or contrary opinions

Example: I don’t mean to be a naysayer , but I don’t think your new business idea is very good.

(to) go along with it – to agree to a plan

Example: Before we present our proposal to the CEO, we have to get our manager to go along with it

(to) have a change of heart – to change one’s mind

Example: The CEO said he was going to retire in a month to spend more time with his family, but then he had a change of heart and decided to stay on the job.

(to) move full steam ahead – to proceed with maximum enthusiasm or energy

Example: George is moving full steam ahead with his plan to start his own software company.

(to) sign on the dotted line – to agree formally to a plan or proposal

Example: We’re almost ready to buy the house, but before we sign on the dotted line , we’re going to ask the sellers to replace the roof.

(to) seal the deal – to come to an agreement

Example: “Are you still interested in buying my car?” — “Yes, but before we seal the deal , I’d like to take it for another test drive.”

Practice the Idioms

Choose the best substitute for the phrase or sentence in bold

1) We like your proposal, and we’re ready to sign on the dotted line

a) sign it

b) look at it

c) discuss it

2) After a three-hour presentation to the client, we were finally able to seal the deal

a) start the negotiations

b) make the sale

c) get them interested

3) You were right on the money when you said I’d enjoy Prague the most of all the cities on the tour.

a) exactly right

b) incorrect

c) thinking of money

4) At first, Jill agreed to transfer to the Mumbai office, but then she had a change of heart

a) started feeling chest pains

b) decided to leave the company

c) changed her mind

5) John and Natasha are moving full steam ahead with their plans to move to the East Coast.

a) proceeding with

b) changing

c) reconsidering

6) Nick didn’t like your idea for the ad campaign? He can be a wet blanket.

a) He doesn’t always like new ideas.

b) He’s always enthusiastic.

c) He’s probably got a good point.

7) You should apply to more than just Harvard. Don’t put all your eggs in one basket.

a) Don’t bother applying to other schools.

b) You probably won’t get into Harvard.

c) Don’t put all your hopes into getting into Harvard.

8) Let’s wait until next year to expand our business into Russia. I’m afraid we’re spreading ourselves too thin right now.

a) losing too much money

b) working on too many projects

c) working too hard

9) Jim couldn’t decide whether to quit the law firm of Dewey, Cheatham & Howe and start his own firm, but he finally decided to go for it

a) do it

b) forget it

c) stay where he was

10) Of course Evan doesn’t think our new project will be successful. He’s such a naysayer

a) so positive

b) so negative

c) so neutral

ANSWERS: 1. A; 2. B; 3. A; 4. C; 5. A; 6. A; 7. C; 8. B; 9. A; 10. B

Continue reading…

 

Key Terms…
  • wet blanket ↔ desmancha-prazeres (dull, boring, depressing)
  • dumplings ↔ dumplings
  • put all our eggs in one basket ↔ arriscar tudo, apostar numa coisa só
  • spread ourselves too thin ↔ fazer muitas coisas no mesmo tempo
  • go for it ↔ ir nessa, arriscar
  • brand name ↔ marca
  • right on the money ↔ direto ao assunto
  • naysayer ↔ contraditor, refutador
  • go along with it ↔ concordar em fazer, apoiar
  • a change of heart ↔ uma mudança de atitude ou opiniã
  • full steam ahead ↔ com todo vapor
  • to sign on the dotted line ↔ a assinar na linha pontilhada
  • to seal the deal ↔ fechar o negócio/acordo
  • to woo.* ↔ cortejar
  • spoils ↔ estraga

 

wet blanket desmancha-prazeres (dull, boring, depressing)
dumplings dumplings
put all our eggs in one basket arriscar tudo, apostar numa coisa só
Not putting all your eggs in one basket is the most basic principle of investing.  
Never, never, never put all your eggs in one basket, no matter how good it looks.  
Diversification is key so that you do not have all of your eggs in one basket.  
spread ourselves too thin fazer muitas coisas no mesmo tempo
If you spread butter on bread, you don’t want to spread it too thin (fina), otherwise you won’t be able to taste it. Similarly, if we spread ourselves too thin, we have less effect on each of the many things we are doing.
I realized I’d been spreading myself too thin so I resigned as secretary of the golf club.
It’s a good idea to get involved in a lot of activities, but don’t spread yourself too thin.
go for it ir nessa, arriscar

“Let’s go for it!” is used in the sense of “Let’s do this even though we don’t know what the consequences might be, or despite being scared”.

As a question such as “Did she go for it?”, one is asking if she believed you, and consequently accepted your idea or proposal.

He’s never gonna go for it (agree to proceed) if we all go.
Did he go for it (Ele concordou com a ideia?)? – No. But I’d say he’s considering it.
Tomlin might go for it on fourth down.(This means that Tomlin is going to risk running or passing the football rather than a safer play on 4th down [there are only 4 tries in football])
right on the money direto ao assunto
Same thing as saying “you nailed it!”.
A similar expression is to simply say “Right on!”, meaning that you support what someone else is saying because it expresses exactly what you were thinking or wishing for.
naysayer contraditor, refutador

“nay” is an older way of expressing “no”, especially when formally giving your opinion. It’s still used in meetings where each member gives his “yay or nay” to agree or disagree with a proposal.

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Yay%20or%20Nay%3F&defid=2628714

Why are you such a naysayer ?
go along with it concordar em fazer, apoiar
Similar to the previous expression “go for it” when used as “Is he gonna go for it?” = “Is he gonna go along with it?”.
Science has given us plenty of knowledge and plenty of doubt to go along with it (e é acompanhado com muitas dúvidas)
Throw it out and throw out all of the meetings and e-mails that go along with it (os e-mails que tem a ver com isso).  
When we do have sex, I just go along with it (aceito fazer sem reclamar) so he’ll stop asking for a few days.  
Why should I go along with it?Para quê eu deveria concordar com isso?
I can’t go along with Jim’s plan. ↔Não posso aderir ao projeto do Jim.
I don’t have the patience to go along with my wife to clothing stores. ↔Não tenho paciência para acompanhar minha mulher nas lojas de roupas.
a change of heart uma mudança de atitude ou opiniã
Of course, Obama caught immediate flak from Republicans for his change of heart.  
In the Arab world, there is little evidence of a change of heart toward Israel.  
to sign on the dotted line a assinar na linha pontilhada
Apparently, “dotted lines (linhas pontilhadas)” were more common in the past when this expression evolved.
to seal the deal fechar o negócio/acordo
Informally, “seal the deal” can refer to having sex with a girl for the first time.
to woo.* cortejar
Supermarkets are trying to woo customers by cutting prices.
The party is clearly trying to woo women voters.
def: to try to persuade people to support you or to buy something from you, especially by saying and doing nice things
def (alt): old-fashioned if a man woos a woman, he tries to start a romantic relationship with her and to persuade her to marry him
spoils estraga
Ever wonder where the term “spoiler” comes from? It comes from this word! (um “estraga-tudo”)

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